Ontario Shuts Down Most Indoor Spots; Olympic/Paralympic Trainees Excluded – SwimSwam

The Canadian province of Ontario has announced sweeping new COVID-19 regulations that will dramatically impact youth sports, including swimming.

Ontario is the most populous Canadian providence with just over 14 million residents, representing about 37% of the population. That includes most of Canada’s Olympic-caliber swimmer, many of whom train out of the High Performance Center in Toronto.

As part of the new restrictions, indoor sports training is closed with “limited exceptions and conditions.” The first example given for those limited exceptions is “athletes training for Olympics and Paralympics.”

This means that athletes based out of the High Performance Center and other such elite swimmers will be spared from the ban, most of Swim Ontario’s other 17,000+ registered swimmers will be forced out of the water. It’s unclear exactly where the line will be drawn, though previously, swimmers at the High Performance Center were allowed to train, while others weren’t.

Swim Ontario CEO Dean Boles told SwimSwam shortly after the announcement that his organization was working with the province, Swimming Canada, and facility partners to have swimmers eligible to continue training, just as they did in prior shutdowns.

“As with the past [High Performance] Exemption there will be many swimmers unable to access water while the stage 2 modified regulations are in place,” Boles said. He continued that they were hoping to receive clarity on Tuesday or Wednesday and have a process in place that would result in “little to no interruption” for those elite athletes.

Other restrictions include expanded requirements for proof of vaccination for large events, limiting outdoor events to 50% spectator capacity, limiting indoor social gatherings to 5 people and outdoor social gatherings to 10 people, limiting activities in public places like dancing or singing that might increase the spread of COVID-containing resperatory droplets, closing indoor dining service in restaurants and bars, and limiting retail capacity.

Those restrictions will be in effect for at least 21 days, from January 5 until January 27, “subject to trends in public health and our health system.”

Schools have also moved to online learning for at least 2 weeks from January 5 until January 17.

Canada, like most of the world, is seeing a spike in new cases of COVID-19 driven by the Omicron strain. The strain, first identified in southern Africa, is proving to spread much more easily than prior strains, but tends to be less harmful to those who are infected.

On December 1, Canada was averaging just under 3,000 new cases per day. By January 2, that number had risen to over 33,000 cases per day – a jump of more than 11 times in a month.

While deaths attributed to COVID-19 haven’t risen as quickly, they have still climbed by 47% in the last 14 days.

At 92 cases per 100,000 residents over the last week, Ontario ranks 2nd-worst to only Quebec (171/100,000) among Canadian provinces.

Canada has had among the world’s strictest controls over COVID-19, but have also kept cases relatively-low: among the lowest in the world in developed nations.

Source: https://swimswam.com/ontario-shuts-down-most-indoor-spots-olympic-paralympic-trainees-excluded/

The Canadian province of Ontario has announced sweeping new COVID-19 regulations that will dramatically impact youth sports, including swimming.

Ontario is the most populous Canadian providence with just over 14 million residents, representing about 37% of the population. That includes most of Canada’s Olympic-caliber swimmer, many of whom train out of the High Performance Center in Toronto.

As part of the new restrictions, indoor sports training is closed with “limited exceptions and conditions.” The first example given for those limited exceptions is “athletes training for Olympics and Paralympics.”

This means that athletes based out of the High Performanc…….

The Canadian province of Ontario has announced sweeping new COVID-19 regulations that will dramatically impact youth sports, including swimming.

Ontario is the most populous Canadian providence with just over 14 million residents, representing about 37% of the population. That includes most of Canada’s Olympic-caliber swimmer, many of whom train out of the High Performance Center in Toronto.

As part of the new restrictions, indoor sports training is closed with “limited exceptions and conditions.” The first example given for those limited exceptions is “athletes training for Olympics and Paralympics.”

This means that athletes based out of the High Performanc…….

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