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Murray: What Jay Norvell leaving for another Mountain West job says about Nevada – Nevada Sports Net

When Jay Norvell was hired as Nevada’s football coach in December 2016, his almost two-decade-long wait to run his own program coming to a close, he set the expectation for the Wolf Pack high.

“The University of Nevada is the flagship program of the state,” Norvell said during his introductory press conference. “It is our charge to make it the flagship program of the Mountain West Conference.”

Unable to reach that level with the Wolf Pack — although Norvell raised Nevada’s profile, and the school will have a better pool of candidates than it did five years ago as a result — the 58-year-old head coach is off to another Mountain West school to attempt to make it the conference’s flagship program. In news that shocked even those in Legacy Hall, Norvell on Monday became the first sitting MW football coach to move from one school to another in the conference when he accepted the Colorado State job.

One one hand, it’s easy to see why the move was made. Norvell made $625,000 annually at Nevada, and the Wolf Pack was reportedly willing to push him into the seven-figure range. It was unwilling to go to Colorado State territory, with the Rams expected to give him a five-year deal worth around $7.5 million if Norvell’s salary matches that of Colorado State’s last two head football coaches. Money talks, but so does support, and Colorado State offers more of that.

The Rams have a $220 million stadium Norvell saw first-hand less than 10 days ago when Nevada thwacked Colorado State, 52-10. The Rams also have an indoor practice facility, albeit one that’s just 70-yards long, something the Wolf Pack needs if it’s serious about football. Colorado State’s football budget, per the 2020 fiscal year, is $26,626,422; Nevada counters at $10,593,220. Now, those are self-reported numbers and probably includes debt financing on the new stadium, but the message Norvell made Monday in leaving Nevada for Colorado State was obvious — sustained championship-level winning will be easier with the Rams than the Wolf Pack. Or, in short, “I can actually turn this program into the MW flagship.”

On the other hand, the move doesn’t make a lot of sense. The end goal for Norvell — and all coaches, honestly — is to run a Power 5 program where you can get generational wealth even if you flame out after three or fours years. Colorado State might trump Nevada when it comes to football salaries, but the real pot of gold is at the end of the Power 5 rainbow. Does this move get Norvell any closer to a Power 5 offer? I don’t think so unless Colorado State finally gets that invitation into the Big 12, which doesn’t seem forthcoming.

Yes, the infrastructure and support are better, but this is also a Colorado State program that has gone 94-133 since the last time Sonny Lubick won 10 games, way back in 2002. It’s had one season of note during that 19-year period, that being a 10-3 campaign in 2014 under Jim McElwain, who was hired away by Florida. Winning at Colorado State is no sure bet regardless of facilities. And Norvell just moved 1,000 miles further away from his bread-and-butter recruiting ground, the fertile streets of Los Angeles where he built his Wolf Pack roster. Not to mention the fact he’s inheriting a roster that quit down the stretch, evident if you watched even a drive or two of the Nevada-Colorado State game.

At Nevada, Norvell’s culture had been put in place, and that was shown in the team’s fight against Air Force and Colorado State even after …….

Source: https://nevadasportsnet.com/news/reporters/murray-what-jay-norvell-leaving-for-another-mountain-west-job-says-about-nevada

When Jay Norvell was hired as Nevada’s football coach in December 2016, his almost two-decade-long wait to run his own program coming to a close, he set the expectation for the Wolf Pack high.

“The University of Nevada is the flagship program of the state,” Norvell said during his introductory press conference. “It is our charge to make it the flagship program of the Mountain West Conference.”

Unable to reach that level with the Wolf Pack — although Norvell raised Nevada’s profile, and the school will have a better pool of candidates than it did five years ago as a result — the 58-year-old head coach is off to another Mountain West school to attempt to make it the …….

When Jay Norvell was hired as Nevada’s football coach in December 2016, his almost two-decade-long wait to run his own program coming to a close, he set the expectation for the Wolf Pack high.

“The University of Nevada is the flagship program of the state,” Norvell said during his introductory press conference. “It is our charge to make it the flagship program of the Mountain West Conference.”

Unable to reach that level with the Wolf Pack — although Norvell raised Nevada’s profile, and the school will have a better pool of candidates than it did five years ago as a result — the 58-year-old head coach is off to another Mountain West school to attempt to make it the …….

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