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Manitoba youth must now be immunized against COVID-19 or tested to play indoor sports – CBC.ca

As of today, Manitobans between the ages of 12 and 17 participating in indoor sports will have to either be vaccinated against COVID-19 or regularly tested.

Kids and teens affected by the latest restrictions will need to have proof of either at least one vaccine dose or a negative COVID-19 rapid test from the past 72 hours to play indoor sports.

“The overall goal of that is to ensure that we have as many vaccinated in that age group as possible or tested,” Chief Provincial Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin said in an online news conference at the beginning of the month.

Those new rules are an effort to control transmission among children and youth. Public health data shows Manitoba’s COVID-19 cases have been increasing most rapidly among people under 20.

The orders apply to all Manitobans aged 12 to 17 entering any indoor sporting or recreation facility as a spectator or to participate.

These facilities include, but are not limited to school gymnasiums, classrooms, multipurpose rooms, and community facilities such as arenas. Indoor practices and competitions are subject to these orders.

Rapid tests will need to be done at participating private pharmacies, not Manitoba’s public testing sites, Roussin said.

One Winnipeg parent says she’s supportive of the public health orders if it means family and friends who are vaccinated can watch sports.

Members of the Westgate Wings pose after they won the Manitoba High School Athletics Association provincial AAAA boys volleyball championships on Saturday. Assistant coach Lorriann Ludwig hopes the latest public health orders will allow family and friends to watch high school sports. (Submitted by Lorriann Ludwig)

Lorriann Ludwig’s 17-year-old son is starting basketball practice at his school on Monday, but his volleyball team the Westgate Wings clinched the Manitoba High Schools Athletic Association AAAA varsity volleyball championship on Saturday.

Although public health orders stipulate that eligible Manitobans with proof of vaccination can watch indoor sports, sometimes the event host will make the decision to not allow spectators in light of the pandemic. That was true for the volleyball championships.

Luckily, Ludwig was able to watch her son Sammy, who is a setter on the team, win the championship because she is the assistant coach. She couldn’t help but feel sad for the team.

“Normally that would be played in front of tons of fans and the whole school,” she told CBC News.

“I really hope that with these new public health orders, that it will just open things up, that they’ll be allowing spectators and that there’ll be more opportunity in high school sports for kids to be able to watch each other play and for that kind of atmosphere in the gym,” she said.

Up north in Thompson, Man., Melissa Meston’s 13-year-old son plays hockey.

Although he’s fully vaccinated and isn’t affected by the orders, Meston worries that some families will be forced to vaccinate their kids or will pull them out entirely, which could have adverse affects.

“It’s a de-stressor, it’s good for their mental health and it’s good to get out, outside of school and outside of the house to socialize and interact with his teammates.”

She understands the government is trying to protect people, but also feels that people who are on the fence about the vaccine are being pressured to act quickly.

“It kind of sucks that some people might …….

Source: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/covid-19-manitoba-youth-vaccine-test-1.6274613

As of today, Manitobans between the ages of 12 and 17 participating in indoor sports will have to either be vaccinated against COVID-19 or regularly tested.

Kids and teens affected by the latest restrictions will need to have proof of either at least one vaccine dose or a negative COVID-19 rapid test from the past 72 hours to play indoor sports.

“The overall goal of that is to ensure that we have as many vaccinated in that age group as possible or tested,” Chief Provincial Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin said in an online news conference at the beginning of the month.

Those new rules are an effort to control transmission among children and youth. Public…….

As of today, Manitobans between the ages of 12 and 17 participating in indoor sports will have to either be vaccinated against COVID-19 or regularly tested.

Kids and teens affected by the latest restrictions will need to have proof of either at least one vaccine dose or a negative COVID-19 rapid test from the past 72 hours to play indoor sports.

“The overall goal of that is to ensure that we have as many vaccinated in that age group as possible or tested,” Chief Provincial Public Health Officer Dr. Brent Roussin said in an online news conference at the beginning of the month.

Those new rules are an effort to control transmission among children and youth. Public…….

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