Keeping kids playing the sport they love – The North Bay Nugget

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A North Bay hockey coach is trying to keep kids on the ice in the safest way possible.

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Last weekend Justin Carre, North Bay Trapper U10 AA hockey coach, asked his players and parents to take a rapid antigen test before game time.

He said it’s one mitigation strategy to reduce the risk and keep kids playing the sport they love.

“I’m just trying to give policy makers some ideas. This is one way we can continue to play and not shut down hockey, which will have a negative impact on kids,” Carre said.

“We had an upcoming game so we decided to try and pilot test this.”

Carre admits the challenge is the cost of the rapid antigen tests which range in cost from $6.50 and up.

“We had an anonymous donor provide the team with 25 kits,” he said. “It would be great if the province could make these kits available to youth sports.”

The Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Health and Ontario Health has provided Ontario students attending in-person learning with rapid antigen test kits to use over the winter holidays.

The use of the tests is voluntary and students are not required to participate to return to school in January.

However, a student who receives a positive result on a rapid antigen test is required to get a PCR test as soon as possible at a local testing site, which in North Bay is at the North Bay Regional Health Centre.

Carre said all his players tested negative and were quite intrigued with the entire process.

He said he’s concerned that the province may again shut down sports, even though hospitals and Intensive Care Units aren’t seeing an increase in the number of patients testing positive for COVID-19.

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There’s been no indication at this point the province will shut down sports, however most hockey associations have taken a pause on the game over the Christmas holidays.

“I see how happy the kids are (when they step on the ice). They have a jump in their step,” Carre said.

“When we won a hockey tournament this year in Hamilton, kids were so happy to hold a medal. It’s been two years. It meant so much to all those kids and their parents.”

Carre said with tools like rapid tests, he hopes not only hockey will keep going, but also the game will not change a lot.

He said not allowing things like face-offs and zero contact fundamentally changes the game of hockey.

“I think most would rather (see) serious mitigation strategies that work rather than changing the game of hockey.”

He said if it comes down to it, another measure would be reduced capacity at rinks.

The province already announced 50 per cent capacity reductions in places like arenas that can hold more than 1,000 people.

“We have a mom on the team who livestreams all the games so parents, grandparents and others who can’t get to the rink have an opportunity to watch it,” Carre said.

Carre said most hockey players and those who play sports will “do just about anything to keep playing the game they love.”

He said he’s reached out to the local governing …….

Source: https://www.nugget.ca/news/keeping-kids-playing-the-sport-they-love

Article content

A North Bay hockey coach is trying to keep kids on the ice in the safest way possible.

Article content

Last weekend Justin Carre, North Bay Trapper U10 AA hockey coach, asked his players and parents to take a rapid antigen test before game time.

He said it’s one mitigation strategy to reduce the risk and keep kids playing the sport they love.

“I’m just trying to give policy makers some ideas. This is one way we can continue to play and not shut down hockey, which will have a negative impact on kids,” Carre said.

“We had an upcoming game so we decided to try and pilot te…….

Article content

A North Bay hockey coach is trying to keep kids on the ice in the safest way possible.

Article content

Last weekend Justin Carre, North Bay Trapper U10 AA hockey coach, asked his players and parents to take a rapid antigen test before game time.

He said it’s one mitigation strategy to reduce the risk and keep kids playing the sport they love.

“I’m just trying to give policy makers some ideas. This is one way we can continue to play and not shut down hockey, which will have a negative impact on kids,” Carre said.

“We had an upcoming game so we decided to try and pilot te…….

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