npressfetimg-959.png

Father’s Day memories: Women in media on the dads who shaped their sports fandom – The Athletic

When I started working as a full-time beat reporter for MLB.com in 2010, my dad, Louis, was so proud he put my business card in the clear plastic sleeve of his wallet, the one where your driver’s license is supposed to go, so he could bring it up to random strangers. Two years before that, when I interned for the Tampa Bay Rays, he printed out every article I wrote over eight months and made it into a scrapbook.

In sports, we often hear of the father-son bond, of how pro athletes got their start playing catch in the yard or watching games with their dad until well past their bedtime. I got into sports because of my dad. We would listen to WFAN nonstop in the car. We’d watch the Yankees every night. (In 2008, he’d also watch Tampa Bay to talk to me every night about my articles. In 2010, when I got the Orioles job, he add a third American League East team to the nightly mix.)

I’d pick horses to win at the Kentucky Derby, play indoor soccer with my sister when Manchester United was on, and play street hockey to the New York Rangers pregame show. When my dad died from lung cancer in 2015, he was only 59. I felt cheated by time, by all the things in sports and life he wouldn’t be here for.

Father’s Day can be tough on a lot of people for a lot of reasons. For me, the best way to cope is to continue to remember, to keep talking about the things that made my dad so great.

This year, I reached out to five other women in various roles in sports media to do the same. Answers have been lightly edited for brevity and clarity.


Emily Jones, Texas Rangers field reporter

My sister and I were raised by our daddy, Don. So much of our family time growing up revolved around sports, whether it was supporting our West Texas small town’s Plainview Bulldogs or curling up on the couch on the weekends to watch games. But it wasn’t until I was more than a decade into my sports broadcasting career that our bond came full circle.

Mike Hargrove and my dad were best friends in high school in Perryton, Tex. My parents asked him to be my godfather, and he obliged. Mike and my dad grew apart over the years, but always managed to stay in touch.

When I started working for the Rangers, Mike was managing the Seattle Mariners. My dad — always the jokester — implored me to go visit the visitors’ clubhouse and tell Mike his goddaughter needed help. I can only imagine what the Human Rain Delay (Hargrove’s nickname) must have been thinking when his public relations director summoned him to the tunnel outside the Mariners clubhouse, where I was waiting.

Daddy had never told Mike I was working for the Rangers. And we hadn’t seen each other since I was a little one, so he obviously had no clue what was going on. I quickly let him in on the joke, we shared a good laugh, and he breathed a giant sigh of relief. He’s already got four daughters of his own, after all.

Mike was one of the first calls I got after my daddy died in 2016. That conversation brought me so much comfort and made me eternally grateful for baseball, the game …….

Source: https://theathletic.com/3367994/2022/06/17/fathers-day-daughters-media-memories/

When I started working as a full-time beat reporter for MLB.com in 2010, my dad, Louis, was so proud he put my business card in the clear plastic sleeve of his wallet, the one where your driver’s license is supposed to go, so he could bring it up to random strangers. Two years before that, when I interned for the Tampa Bay Rays, he printed out every article I wrote over eight months and made it into a scrapbook.

In sports, we often hear of the father-son bond, of how pro athletes got their start playing catch in the yard or watching games with their dad until well past their bedtime. I got into sports because of my dad. We would listen to WFAN nonstop in the car. We’d watch the…….

When I started working as a full-time beat reporter for MLB.com in 2010, my dad, Louis, was so proud he put my business card in the clear plastic sleeve of his wallet, the one where your driver’s license is supposed to go, so he could bring it up to random strangers. Two years before that, when I interned for the Tampa Bay Rays, he printed out every article I wrote over eight months and made it into a scrapbook.

In sports, we often hear of the father-son bond, of how pro athletes got their start playing catch in the yard or watching games with their dad until well past their bedtime. I got into sports because of my dad. We would listen to WFAN nonstop in the car. We’d watch the…….

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *