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A numbers game: How UNM has shifted toward Title IX compliance – Albuquerque Journal

Fifty years ago this month, Title IX changed the course of gender equity in education.

And while this past week has shined a light on trailblazers and celebrated strides made in the past half century thanks in large part to the landmark legislation, there are also constant reminders that there is still a ways to go before true gender equity in college athletics exists.

As part of the Journal’s continuing Title IX series, we wanted to narrow the focus and examine not how far UNM has come in terms of gender equity in athletics since 1972. But also it is necessary to see how it moved toward gender equity compliance just in the past four years since releasing a 38-page Title IX assessment report that shined a light on an athletic department that was falling short in terms of providing its female athletes the same opportunities as their male counterparts.UNM’s Amelia Mazza-Downie captures the Mountain West’s individual cross country championship on October 29, 2021. (Mike Sandoval/For the Albuquerque Journal)

“We are committed to equity and have been concerned for many months that our athletics program is not in compliance with federal law,” UNM President Garnett Stokes and athletic director Eddie Nuñez co-wrote in a letter to the campus community on May 18, 2018, when the report was made public.

“… Understanding compliance with Title IX can be complicated, but it is clear from the independent review that the University is falling short in adhering to federal guidelines.”

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Numerous concerns were brought to light in a report some criticized as being crafted as a justification for impending sports cuts that came later that summer.

But none was more glaring than the participation disparity between male and female athletes.

Title IX requires a school to offer female opportunities in athletics at a “substantially proportional” rate to the male-to-female ratio of the general student body enrollment.

For the 2016-17 academic year — the one referenced in the Title IX assessment report — females made up 55.4% of UNM’s undergraduate enrollment, but only 43.8% of the participants in athletics. And they accounted for 70 fewer participation spots overall than their male counterparts. (Participation opportunities include practice players and athletes on partial scholarship.)

Four years after the report was released and five academic years of data reports later females accounted for 53.8% of UNM’s athletic opportunities in 2021-22. That is thanks to a combination of roster management that saw some male sport rosters reduced in size and some female ones increased and the cutting of sports like men’s soccer.

In UNM’s most recent Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act (EADA) report filed to the Department of Education, the Lobos reported 281 female participants compared with 241 male.

Spending is still significantly slanted toward men’s sports at UNM — something common for any university that fields a football team. But because of the improved participation numbers, UNM is now considered Title IX compliant.

“We want to make sure that it doesn’t matter what sport you’re in, you’re gonna get everything we can offer you — from academics, to the (financial) aid that you’re able to get per sport, to additional assistance in mental health or nutrition or anything we can do,” Nuñez said. “I want to make it as equal as possible between male and female student-athletes. … Are the numbers as perfect as they …….

Source: https://www.abqjournal.com/2511533/a-numbers-game-how-unm-has-shifted-toward-title-ix-compliance.html

Fifty years ago this month, Title IX changed the course of gender equity in education.

And while this past week has shined a light on trailblazers and celebrated strides made in the past half century thanks in large part to the landmark legislation, there are also constant reminders that there is still a ways to go before true gender equity in college athletics exists.

As part of the Journal’s continuing Title IX series, we wanted to narrow the focus and examine not how far UNM has come in terms of gender equity in athletics since 1972. But also it is necessary to see how it moved toward gender equity compliance just in the past four years since releasing a 38…….

Fifty years ago this month, Title IX changed the course of gender equity in education.

And while this past week has shined a light on trailblazers and celebrated strides made in the past half century thanks in large part to the landmark legislation, there are also constant reminders that there is still a ways to go before true gender equity in college athletics exists.

As part of the Journal’s continuing Title IX series, we wanted to narrow the focus and examine not how far UNM has come in terms of gender equity in athletics since 1972. But also it is necessary to see how it moved toward gender equity compliance just in the past four years since releasing a 38…….

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